1. Leviton Product Documents
1.1. OmniTouch Templates
When printing the attached templates, make sure that “Page Scaling” is set to “None” and “Auto-Rotate and Center” is deselected (no check in the box), under “Page Handling” in the print dialog.  
1.2. Communications Protocols
1.2.1. HAI Omni-Link Protocol Revisions
1.2.1.1. Sample CRC Calculation

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void UpdateCRC(unsigned short int *CRC, unsigned char x)
{
  // This function uses the initial CRC value passed in the first
  // argument, then modifies it using the single character passed
  // as the second argument, according to a CRC-16 polynomial
  // calculation used for HAI communication protocol.

  // Arguments:
  //   CRC -- pointer to starting CRC value
  //   x   -- new character to be processed

  // Returns:
  // The function does not return any values, but updates the variable
  // pointed to by CRC

  static int const Poly = 0xA001;    // CRC-16 polynomial
  int i;
  bool flag;

  *CRC ^= x;
  for (i=0; i<8; i++)
  {
    flag = ((*CRC & 1) == 1);
    *CRC = (unsigned short int)(*CRC >> 1);
    if (flag)
      *CRC ^= Poly;
  }
  return;
}

1.2.1.2. Setting Date and Time using Omni-Link Protocol

 

Here is info on setting the controller time and date using the Omni-Link Protocol

 

            Start character               0x5A

            Message length             0x08

            Message type                0x10

            Data 1                           Year (0-99)

            Data 2                           Month (1-12)

            Data 3                           Day (1-31)

            Data 4                           Day of week (1-7 = Monday-Sunday)

            Data 5                           Hour (0-23)

            Data 6                           Minute (0-59)

            Data 7                           DST Flag (non-zero for DST)

            CRC 1                           varies

            CRC 2                           varies

 

1.2.2. HAI Network Protocol Rev A
1.2.3. Leviton Pro-Link Description


DESCRIPTION

Pro-Link is a programmable protocol whose messages can be programmed into the controller. Using Pro-Link, a Leviton controller can send commands to and interpret commands from systems that are not programmable, such as lighting controls and infrared controls. 

The RS-232 interface is configured as DTE (data terminal equipment). This is the same configuration as provided on a typical personal computer. Data is transmitted asynchronously using standard nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) format (one start bit, eight data bits, and a single stop bit) at up to 9600 baud.

The Pro-Link protocol allows you to send and receive predefined text messages through a controller serial interface. Each message can be up to 15 ASCII characters long. Several messages can be strung together and sent as one long message. Messages can be sent using any system trigger (timed, event, or macro) just like any other item in the controller. 

Pro-Link also monitors each serial interface for incoming messages. Incoming ASCII strings that match stored messages in the controller can be used to activate macros. When a message is matched, the Program Command (macro) corresponding to the matching message is activated. When receiving an ASCII message that is over 15 characters, the controller only processes the last 15 characters of the message.

 

SEND MESSAGE COMMAND

Use the Message Menu to send a message through the serial port.

Note: prior to sending and receiving messages, each message must be defined under Setup | Names | Message in the controller.

To enter the Message menu, from the top-level display or from the main menu, press the 8 (MESSAGE) key on the console keypad.

                MESSAGE
      
1=SHOW 2=LOG   3=CLEAR¯
 
       4=SEND

The 4 (SEND) key allows you to send any of the preprogrammed text messages through the Pro-Link serial port. You are first prompted to specify the desired serial port.

        SERIAL PORT:
       
1-4

Next, select the message to be sent. You may enter the message number followed by the ' # ' key to send that message, or simply press the down arrow key to scroll through a list of messages. Press the ' # ' key to send the selected message:

                MSGNAME
       
ENTER MESSAGE:         ¯

The message is sent out through the specified Pro-Link port exactly as the message was entered in Setup | Names | Message.


Carriage returns and line feed characters are not automatically appended to the end. To send ASCII control as part to the message, use the caret "^" character in the message. This character specifics that the next character is to be interpreted as an ASCII control character, such as "^M" to represent a carriage return.

Other useful sequences would be "^J" for a line feed character and "^G" for a bell character. To include an actual "^" character in the message, enter it twice as in "^^".

Each message can be up to 15 characters long. To send a longer message, simply program two messages to be sent one after the other.


RECEIVE MESSAGE ACTIVATED BUTTON

The When Button Program menu has been expanded to add the 8 (MSG) button.

Pro-Link also has the capability to monitor the serial port for incoming text messages. When a text message is received, Pro-Link searches through all preprogrammed messages looking for a matching message. If one is found, the Program Command (macro) corresponding to the matching message is activated.

From the Edit Program When menu, press the 2 (BUTTON) key to set up a program to be activated when a particular button is run or a particular event occurs. The user is prompted to specify the button/event that activates the program:

       BUTTON:
       
ENTER BUTTON    #=MENU ¯

Pressing the ' # ' key first will bring up a menu of button types:

      BUTTON TYPE
     
1=CTRL 2=SEC   3=ZONE ¯

      4=ALL   5=ALARM 6=X-10
     
7=MISC 8=MSG          ­

Pressing the 8 (MSG) key allows you to select the button for a "receive message" activated event. You are prompted to enter the desired message:

      MESSAGE:
     
ENTER MESSAGE          ¯

The message may be entered by entering the message number followed by the ' # ' key or by using the arrow keys to scroll through the list of messages.

Pro-Link determines that a message has been received when:

·         One or more characters have been received followed by 100 ms of silence

·         One or more characters followed by a carriage return character are received

·         One or more characters followed by a line feed character are received

It is not necessary to enter the terminating carriage return or line feed character as part of the message name.
1.2.3.1. Pro-Link Message Length
Question: Can a Leviton controller send/receive Pro-Link messages greater than 15 characters in length?


Answer:

The Message names are limited to 15 characters, and there is no work-a-round for that.  With that said, you do have a couple of options:

 

  1. To send an ASCII message greater than 15 characters, simple use multiple messages and create a programming macro to send the consecutive messages.  Your logic would look similar to:

 

WHEN BUTTON X: SEND MESSAGE Y OUT SERIAL PORT Z

WHEN BUTTON X: SEND MESSAGE AA OUT SERIAL PORT Z

 

  1. If an incoming ASCII string is greater than 15 characters, the Leviton controller will only recognize the last 15 characters.  Although not technically accurate, this would be similar to dropping character 1 when character 16 arrives, dropping 2 when 17 arrives, and so forth.  With that said, you may simply be able to use the last several characters of the devices ASCII string.  This will not work in all cases, but should be useful in most.

 

1.2.4. Thermostat Protocol
1.3. Firmware Updates
1.3.1. Omni Controller
1.3.2. Omni Pro Controller
1.3.3. Omni LT Controller
1.3.4. Omni II Controller
1.3.5. Omni Pro II Controller
1.3.6. Lumina
1.3.7. Lumina Pro
1.4. Leviton Omni Family of Controller Documents
1.4.1. Controller Owner Manuals
1.4.2. Command Summaries
1.5. Thermostats
1.5.1. Choosing the Right Thermostat
 

Purpose:

The purpose of this documentation is to provide customers with the proper knowledge to choose the proper thermostat (tstat) for the desired application. Although Leviton tstats are classified as electronic, communicating models, they are considered typical “mechanical” models, with regards to functionality. Also, there are some additional factors that can affect which product is used.

Discussion:

Proper tstat selection will typically depend on three (3) primary factors:

  1. Conventional Heat/Cool or Heat Pump
  2. Single vs. Multi-Stage
  3. Zone/Damper Control

HAI manufactures 2 primary models of tstats – RC-1000 and RC-2000. They are applied as follows:

  1. RC-1000 – This model is used for single stage conventional heat and/or cool systems, as well as single stage heat pump systems (Single stage cool and primary heat, with auxiliary heat support). Although designed to support “power-stealing” (employing R, G, Y, and W), HAI recommends using a common in all applications. NOTES:   In heat only applications, three conductors (R, W, and C) are required. A cool only application requires four conductors (R, G, Y, and C). The RC-1000 can be used in many (not all) zone control applications that “do not” require a master/slave or similar configurations.
  2. RC-2000 – This model is designed for use in multi-stage conventional heat/cool and heat pump systems, providing up to two stages of cooling and up to three stages of heating. The RC-200 can also be used in single stage systems. This model “is required” for applications employing Master/Slave zoning applications. The RC-2000 also has a built-in humidity sensor and output control for humidity applications.

Additionally, the following models, which have been discontinued, would be applied as follows:

  1. RC-80B – This model is used for single stage conventional heat and/or cool systems - it was originally designed as a “power-stealing” tstat (employing R, G, Y, and W), but with the addition of the back light feature, most applications require a fifth conductor for the common. NOTE:   In heat only applications, three conductors (R, W, and C) are required. A cool only application requires four conductors (R, G, Y, and C).
  2. RC-90B – This model is used primarily in zone/damper applications where a master/slave configuration is employed. It can also be used in applications to replace the RC-80B, where the “power-stealing” feature is causing performance issues.
  3. RC-100B – This model is used for single stage heat pump systems and has an auxiliary heat feature. This model is not designed for “dual-source” heat pumps, although in some applications, there is an Emergency Heat work-a-round available.
  4. RC-112B – This model is used for multi-stage heat pumps. It provides two stages of cooling and up to three stages of heat.
  5. RC-122B – This model is used for multi-stage conventional heat/cool systems and provides 2 stages of cooling and heating.

Zone/Damper control products can introduce some interesting dynamics in tstat selection. Some of the more important dynamics are:

  1. Older control products utilize a master/slave configuration, which would require the use of an RC-2000 at the Master, as well as each Slave location.
  2. Transformers – In some applications, the zone/damper controller will only provide 24VAC for the master tstat. In these applications, a 24VAC, 5-20vA transformer can be connected to the Rh and C terminals of the RC-2000 in Slave locations (CRITICAL NOTE: the factory jumper between Rc and Rh must be removed in this application).
  3. Some zone/damper control companies have begun manufacturing products that utilize tstats designed to “communicate” directly with the zone/damper controller. Some examples are the Carrier Comfort zone and Infinity Control, the Trane Comfort Link, and the Bryant Evolution. In these applications, Leviton tstats are 100% incompatible and cannot be used without additional hardware (Leviton automation controller and zone control RS-232 interface).
1.6. HLC HAI Lighting Control Documentation
1.7. Access Control Reader
1.7.1. Troubleshooting Tips For Access Control Reader
Wiring is one of the biggest causes for problems when using the 75A00-1 Access Card Reader. The pinout for the built-in serial ports on Leviton controllers are:
With the above stated, your pinout should be using Pins 4 & 5, where Pin 5 should be connected to the Gray (A) and Pin 4 should be connected to the Orange (B) wires of the reader, as detailed in the picture below:
 
 

Once the above has been confirmed, plug the cable into the serial port.

The next useful tip is related to the RS-232/485 jumper below the serial port being used. The jumper below the serial port on the controller must be set to RS-485 (center and right pins on 3-position jumper,

Another tip is related to configuring the reader. Although the reader and cards can be configured using PC Access, Leviton recommends using the controller and console to configure, as this procedure reduces the potential for human error. To properly enroll the reader, perform the following steps from a console:

  1. From the Installer Setup menu, press the 7 (EXP) key. Use the [Down Arrow] key to scroll to the appropriate Serial X Function (where X is the number of the serial port being used).
  2. Press #-1-8-# - the display should now show that the Serial Function is set to type 18 – ACCESS CONTROL.
  3. Use the [Down Arrow] to scroll to READER 1 ADDRESS.  CRITICAL NOTE:  If the address listed shows anything other than 0.0.0.0, press # (DELETE), and then 1 (YES) – the display should read as

      READER 1 ADDRESS:

0.0.0.0                                      #=CFG

  1. Press the # (Configure) – the display should read as:

        CONFIGURE READER 1

        SWIPE CARD 3 TIMES

  1. Go to the Access Control Reader to be enrolled and swipe any HAI Access Control Card or Key Tag 3 times in front of the reader – you should hear/see the following:
    1. After the first swipe, you should hear a single beep tone.
    2. After the second swipe, you should hear a single beep tone.
    3. After the third swipe, you should hear a “longer” single beep tone.
    4. The display on the console should display:

        READER 1 ADDRESS:

        X.X.X.X #=DEL (where the X’s should be populated with the values of    the card reader’s address.

NOTE: You have 3 minutes to complete the operation once the system is put into configuration mode. If a Leviton Access Control Card or Key Tag has not been swiped 3 times within the first 3 minutes, the controller will automatically exit configuration mode.

1.7.2. Can I connect a 75A00-2 Access Control Card Reader to any serial port?
Question: Can I connect a 75A00-2 Access Control Card Reader to any serial port?


Answer: No.  The Access Control Card Reader should not be connected to Serial 1 on an Omni or Lumina controller.  Reader should be connected to Serial 2-5.
1.7.3. My New Access Card Reader has a 10 Pin Connector On It

Some readers are shipped with the connector still attached. Simply cut off the connector as close to the connector as possible

1.8. ZigBee
1.8.1. Blank ZIM after Contrast Adjustment
If the ZIM contrast is adjusted to the maximum value, the screen will be lit but blank. There is no way to adjust the value back down. Disconnect the ZIM from the serial cable, then remove the two screws to disassemble it. Remove the battery, wait ten seconds and then replace the battery. Plug in the cable. The display should return to normal.
1.8.2. Explanation of ZigBee Network
The following is a brief explanation of how ZigBee works - hopefully it is simple enough where the average user can follow along.

In a ZigBee network there are three types of devices, coordinator, router, and end devices.  There is only one coordinator in the network and typically the brains behind the network.  Routers are devices that are always powered and can act as repeaters for other devices.  End devices are typically battery powered devices that must join to a nearby parent to participate in the network.  A coordinator or  router can be a parent if has the available memory.

In a ZigBee network, battery powered devices are typically low power.  These devices spend most of the time asleep and wake up occasionally to ask its parent if there are any pending messages.  There is no mandated time that dictates how long the battery powered device can be sleeping, so parents have to adapt to devices that can sleep from .1 second to several hours.  This means the parent has to have enough memory to buffer up messages to this battery powered devices for as long as it chooses to remain sleeping.

Leviton currently offers:

ZigBee Interface Module (ZIM) – High powered coordinator that can server as a parent for 4 end devices.

81A00-3ZB

Programmable Communication Thermostat (PCT) – High Powered router that can server as a parent for 4 end devices.

RC-2000XXZB

RC-1000XXZB

Load Control Module (LCM ) – High Powered router that can server as a parent for 4 end devices.

73A00-3ZB

73A00-4ZB

89A00-1ZB


1.8.3. Updating ZigBee Devices
 

INTRODUCTION

This document describes the ZigBee functional capabilities of Leviton's ZigBee Updater. This document will give a brief overview of the installation and use of the updater. 

WHAT CAN BE UPDATED WITH THIS UPDATE
 
This updater is intended to update all ZigBee OTA compliant devices that are connected to the ZigBee network.

Known compatible devices:

Leviton’s ZigBee Interface Module (ZIM)

Leviton’s RC1000 & RC2000 thermostat (PCT)

Leviton’s Load Control Modules (LCM)

Leviton’s Microcontrol (ZIM)

Leviton’s Companion (IHD)

Other devices that are connected to the ZigBee network and follow the standard ZigBee OTA specifications can also be updated provided the update files (.zigbee) are readily available.

ZIGBEE UPDATE FILES

Several devices have two separate update files, one for the radio and one for the device itself. Each file must be updated individually. CRITICAL NOTE: Where updates are available for both device and radio, you “must” update the radio first, in order to insure proper update of the entire ZigBee Network.

Update Files:

ZigBee Interface Module (ZIM)

ZIM_HA_VXXXX.Zigbee                            Device Firmware

ZIM_HA_RADIO_VXXXX.Zigbee                        Radio Firmware (UPDATE THIS FIRST)
 

RC1000 & RC2000 thermostat (PCT)

RC1000_HA_VXXXX.Zigbee                      RC1000 Device Firmware

RC2000_HA_VXXXX.Zigbee                      RC2000 Device Firmware

PCT_HA_RADIO_VXXXX.Zigbee             Radio Firmware for RC1000 & RC2000 UPDATE THIS FIRST
 

Load Control Modules (LCM)

LCM_HA_RADIO_VXXXX.Zigbee                       Radio Firmware (LCMs have no device firmware)

Microcontrol (ZIM)

ZIM_HA_VXXXX.Zigbee                            Device Firmware

ZIM_HA_RADIO_VXXXX.Zigbee                        Radio Firmware (UPDATE THIS FIRST)
 

Companion (IHD)

IHD_HA_VXXXX.Zigbee                            Device Firmware

IHD_HA_RADIO_VXXXX.Zigbee                        Radio Firmware (UPDATE THIS FIRST)
 

ZIGBEE UPDATE PROCEDURE

In order to update the devices on the ZigBee network, the update file must first be uploaded to the coordinator of the network, which is the ZIM. This is done with the ZigBee Update Utility. Once the ZIM has the update file, it will push the update to all devices that could use that update. For example if you upload a new thermostat firmware to the ZIM, the ZIM will proceed to update all thermostats that are currently on the network.

Procedure:

1)      Connect the ZIM to a PC via USB

2)      Run ZigBee Updater

3)      Select “Check for Updates” to download the latest firmware for all Leviton ZigBee compatible devices.

4)      Select the folder to navigate and select an update file (CRITICAL NOTE: Always choose the radio firmware for a device first).

5)      Select the COM port that is connected to the ZIM

6)      Select “Start Update” to begin

7)      Navigate to ZigBee Setup in the ZIM (Menu -> ZigBee Setup). This will allow monitoring of the update process.

Once the ZIM shows a status of “All Updates Sent”, more updates can be started if necessary.
1.8.4. ZigBee Frequency
Question: What frequency does the Leviton ZIM use?   

Answer: The ZIM uses the 2.4 GHz frequency range.
1.8.5. Where can I obtain the ZigBee Updater Utility?
Question: Where can I obtain the ZigBee Updater Utility?

Answer: The ZigBee Updater Utility can be found at the following link: http://www.homeauto.com/zigbeeupdater/
1.8.6. ZigBee Updater FAQ's
Question:

How long will the update process take?
 
Answer:
 
Each update takes about 15 minutes per device.


Question
:
 
Is there a particular order I should follow when updating?

Answer
:
 
YES! Always start with the radio firmware first. This will ensure that the latest firmware is being used to update the rest of the upgrade process.


Question
:
 
Do I have to perform updates?

Answer
:
 
No, updates are only necessary to support new devices and features.
1.8.7. Omni/Lumina ZigBee Integration, Controller Firmware 3.7

INTRODUCTION

Leviton Omni and Lumina family controllers support two-way integration with ZigBee thermostats and load control modules. Individual ZigBee devices can be controlled by the Leviton controller and the Leviton controller can respond to changes in the ZigBee devices.

LOAD CONTROL

Each PC Access unit can be associated with a corresponding ZigBee dimmer or other load control module. ZigBee devices can be turned on, turned off, brightened, dimmed, set to a specific level, or toggled on/off.

THERMOSTAT CONTROL

Each Leviton thermostat can be associated with a corresponding ZigBee thermostat. ZigBee thermostats can be controlled and monitored as it they were standard Leviton hardwired thermostats.

INSTALLATION

The Leviton controller connects to the ZigBee network by using a Model 81A00-3ZB ZigBee Interface Module (ZIM). Set the jumper on the controller serial port to the “485” position. Set the Serial Function for the serial port on the Leviton controller to ZigBee.

The ZIM serves as the coordinator for the ZigBee network. Individual ZigBee devices need to be enrolled through the coordinator before they may participate in the ZigBee network. When a device is enrolled in the ZigBee network, it is assigned a unique four digit address by the coordinator. This address is used by the Leviton controller to access the device. ZigBee devices may also be disbanded through the coordinator to remove them from the network.

Devices may be enrolled or disbanded by using the ZIM directly, by using an Omni or Lumina console to command the ZIM, or by using PC Access software to command the ZIM. The recommended method is to use PC Access software to ensure that the ZigBee addresses are stored in the PC Access account file.

Installation Using PC Access

First, connect to the Leviton controller using the PC Access software.

To set up units, set the House Code Format for the desired units in the Leviton controller to ZigBee. Now click on the button in the “Address/Node ID” column for the desired unit. If the address is non-zero, a ZigBee device has already been enrolled for the unit. If this is not the correct device, press the “Disband” button in the dialog box to disband the current device. After any existing device has been disbanded, place the new ZigBee device in the enrollment mode by following the instructions for the device. Then press the “Enroll” button in the dialog box to enroll the new device. If the enrollment process is successful, the ZigBee address for the device will be shown.

Follow a similar process for thermostats. First, set the thermostat type for the thermostat to “Auto Heat/Cool”, “Heat/Cool”, “Heat Only”, or “Cool Only” as appropriate. Click on the button in the “Protocol/Address” column for the desired thermostat, set the protocol to “ZigBee”, place the thermostat in the enrollment mode, and enroll the thermostat by pressing the “Enroll” button.

Note that if PC Access is not connected to the Leviton controller, the “Enroll” and “Disband” buttons will be disabled. ZigBee addresses may be manually entered if the ZigBee network has been previously configured by using the ZIM directly.

Installation Using Console

An Omni or Lumina console can be used to initiate enroll and disband operations at the ZIM.

To set up units, set the House Code Format for the desired units in the Leviton controller to ZigBee. Press “#” twice when displaying the status of the desired unit. Select “Disband” to disband any ZigBee device currently assigned to the unit. Place the new ZigBee device in the enrollment mode and then select “Enroll” to enroll the new device.

Follow a similar process for thermostats. First, set the thermostat type for the thermostat to “Auto Heat/Cool”, “Heat/Cool”, “Heat Only”, or “Cool Only” as appropriate. Press “#” twice when displaying the status of the desired thermostat. Select “Disband” to disband any ZigBee device currently assigned to the thermostat. Place the new ZigBee device in the enrollment mode and then select “Enroll” to enroll the new device.

After enrolling or disbanding a ZigBee device remember to use PC Access to read from the controller so that the ZigBee addresses can be saved in the PC Access account file.


Installation Using ZIM

Follow the instructions for the ZIM to manually configure the ZigBee network. Record the ZigBee address for each ZigBee device enrolled at the ZIM and then enter these addresses manually into PC Access as described above.

LEVITON CONTROLLER COMPATABILITY

ZigBee is supported by Leviton Omni LTe, Omni IIe, OmniPro II, Lumina, and Lumina Pro systems. The systems must be utilizing controller firmware 3.7 or later.

1.8.8. Omni/Lumina ZigBee Lock Integration, Controller Firmware 3.10
INTRODUCTION
 
Leviton Omni and Lumina family controllers support two-way integration with ZigBee wireless locks. The controller can lock and unlock the locks and monitor changes in the states of the locks. Locking/unlocking a lock can trigger automation programs in the controller, and the state of the lock can be used as a condition in the automation programming.
 
The integration has been specifically verified with the Black & Decker Kwikset SmartCode locks and Yale Real Living™ Push Button Deadbolt and Yale Real Living™ Touchscreen Deadbolt locks, but it should work with other locks that support the standard ZigBee Home Automation profile lock cluster.

INSTALLATION

The Omni or Lumina controller connects to the ZigBee network by using a Model 81A00-3ZB ZigBee Interface Module (ZIM). Set the jumper on the controller serial port to the “485” position. Set the Serial Function for the serial port on the controller to ZigBee.

The ZIM serves as the coordinator for the ZigBee network. Individual ZigBee devices need to be enrolled through the coordinator before they may participate in the ZigBee network. When a device is enrolled in the ZigBee network, it is assigned a unique four digit address by the coordinator. This address is used by the controller to access the device. ZigBee devices may also be disbanded through the coordinator to remove them from the network.

Devices may be enrolled or disbanded by using the ZIM directly or by using PC Access software to command the ZIM. The recommended method is to use PC Access software to ensure that the ZigBee addresses are stored in the PC Access account file.

The ZIM must be running firmware version 14.08 or later. Use the Leviton ZigBee Updater to update the ZIM firmware if necessary. The HAI ZigBee Updater software can be found at http://www.homeauto.com/ZigBeeUpdater/.

Installation Using  PC Access

First, connect to the Omni or Lumina controller using the PC Access software.

ZigBee locks appear under the Access Control section of PC Access. To set up locks, click on the button in the “Device Type/Address” column for the desired access control device. Set the “Access Control Device Type” to “ZigBee Lock”. If the address is non-zero, a ZigBee lock has already been enrolled.  If this is not the correct device, press the “Disband” button in the dialog box to disband the current device. After any existing lock has been disbanded, press the “Enroll” button in the dialog box. Then place the new ZigBee lock in the enrollment mode by following the manufacturer instructions for the lock. If the enrollment process is successful, the ZigBee address for the lock will be shown.

Note that if PC Access is not connected to the  controller, the “Enroll” and “Disband” buttons will be disabled. ZigBee addresses may be manually entered if the ZigBee network has been previously configured by using the ZIM directly.

To place a Black & Decker Kwikset SmartCode lock into enrollment mode, first remove the cover from the lock assembly. Press the top right button nine times until both the red and white lights blink. Then press the top left button four times until both the red and white lights blink.

Installation Using ZIM

Follow the instructions for the ZIM to manually configure the ZigBee network. Record the ZigBee address for each ZigBee device enrolled at the ZIM, and then enter these addresses manually into PC Access as described above.

OPERATION

ZigBee locks are controllable through the “Access Control” section of Leviton IP-based user interfaces. Locks are not directly controllable through Omni or Lumina consoles or  OmniTouch 3.9/5.7 console bus-connected touchscreens.

Automation programming for locks may be entered through the “Access Control” sections of PC Access software. Changes in the state of a lock can be used to trigger automation programming, and the state of a lock may be used as a condition in automation programming. Commands to lock/unlock the lock may also be entered.


LEVITON CONTROLLER COMPATABILITY

ZigBee locks are supported by Leviton Omni LTe, Omni IIe, OmniPro II, Lumina and Lumina Pro systems. The systems must be utilizing controller firmware 3.10 or later.

1.8.9. Door Lock Does Not Report Correct Status
 

Discussion:

Customer reports that their door lock is not reporting the correct status. In troubleshooting, it is determined that:

  1. The controller has the correct firmware (3.10 or later).
  2. The controller setup is correct.
  3. The lock is properly enrolled in the system.
  4. The lock responds to lock and unlock commands from the controller.

Cause:

The hole for the deadbolt has not been drilled deep enough, preventing the deadbolt from fully extending in the lock position. In this scenario, the lock will always report its status as unlocked.

Resolution:

Drilling the hole for the deadbolt, allowing it to extend to a fully locked position will resolve the problem.

1.8.10. ZigBee Control of Third Party Devices
Question: Can Leviton's ZigBee interface control third party devices?


Answer:

The current ZIM firmware (15.03) can control standard On/Off loads, thermostats, and door locks that follow the Zigbee Alliance HA specifications.

1.8.11. ZigBee 30A LCM Wiring
Problem Summary: Customer reports that after installing the 73A00-3ZX 30A LCM and powering up breaker, the LCM begins constantly cycling off and on. The only way to stop the
cycling is to turn off the breaker.
           

Cause:


When the 30A LCM is incorrectly wired, where the source hot wire is connected to the orange, everything would work correctly at initial power up.   When the load is turned off, this would make the relay open, thus cutting off power to the entire LCM (since the power was coming in through the orange).  When the LCM turns off, the relay closes, thus restoring power.  This will result in constant cycling of the relay since the LCM recognizes when power is restored and the load should be off, thus creating an endless cycle.
 

Resolution:


The 30A LCM has only 3 wires.   The White and Black wires are for the power source, usually a breaker, where White = hot and Black = neutral.   The Orange and Black wires go to the load, where Orange = HOT/FLOATING and Black = Neutral.  When the LCM is first turned on, since the relay is normally closed, the load is turned on.